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Shooting

HONOURS

PARALYMPIC MEDAL WINNERS

LONDON 2012

Silver – Matthew Skelhon (Mixed 10 m Air Rifle Prone SH1)
Bronze – Matthew Skelhon (Mixed 50 m Rifle Prone SH1)
Bronze – James Bevis (Mixed 10 m Air Rifle Prone SH2)

BEIJING 2008

Gold – Matthew Skelhon (Mixed 10 m Air Rifle Prone SH1)

ATHENS 2004

Gold – Isabel Newstead MBE (Women’s Air Pistol SH1)

SYDNEY 2000

Gold – Isabel Newstead MBE (Women’s Air Pistol SH1)
Bronze – Deanna Coates MBE (Women’s Air Rifle SH1)

ATLANTA 1996

Gold – Deanna Coates MBE (Women’s Air Rifle Standing SH1)
Silver – Deanna Coates MBE (Women’s Air Rifle 3 x 20 SH1)

BARCELONA 1992

Gold – Deanna Coates MBE (Women’s Air Rifle Standing SH1-3)
Bronze – Robert Cooper (Men’s Air Rifle Standing SH1)
Bronze – Kevin John Hyde (Mixed Air Rifle 3 x 40 SH4)
Bronze – John Campbell (Mixed English Match SH1-3)

SEOUL 1988

Gold – Deanna Coates (Women’s Air Rifle Standing 2-6)
Silver – Keith Morriss (Men’s Air Rifle Sitting LSH1)
Bronze – Keith Morriss (Men’s Air Rifle Sitting LSH1)
Bronze – Isabel Newstead MBE (as Isabel Barr) (Women’s Air Pistol 2-6)
Bronze – Gill Middleton (Women’s Air Rifle Prone 2-6)
Bronze – Gill Middleton (Women’s Air Rifle Standing 2-6)

STOKE MANDEVILLE 1984

Gold – Pete Haslam (Men’s Air Rifle Kneeling 1A-1C)
Gold – Isabel Newstead MBE (as Isabel Barr) (Women’s Air Pistol 1A-1C)
Silver – Pete Haslam (Men’s Air Rifle Prone 1A-1C)
Silver – Pete Haslam (Mixed Air Rifle 3 Positions 1A-1C)
Silver – Ann Picot (Women’s Air Rifle Integrated)
Silver – Deanna Coates MBE (Women’s Air Rifle Kneeling 2-6)
Silver – Deanna Coates MBE (Women’s Air Rifle Standing 2-6)
Silver – Great Britain (Pistol Team 1A-6)
Bronze – Pete Haslam (Men’s Air Rifle Standing 1A-1C)
Bronze – Deanna Coates MBE (Women’s Air Rifle 3 Positions 2-6)

Categories
Shooting

MEDALS AT USA NATIONALS

THE BRITISH SHOOTING PARALYMPIC PROGRAMME RETURNED FROM THE USA SHOOTING RIFLE AND PISTOL NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIPS WITH NINE MEDALS, INCLUDING FOUR GOLDS.

The event had been upgraded to a World Shooting Para Sport sanctioned event to compensate for the cancellation of the World Cup in Korea and athletes from Korea, Ukraine, Canada, Brazil and Ireland joined GB and the hosts for a week of competition at Fort Benning.

With two matches in each event the competition experience will be vital preparation for the next World Cup in September in Croatia.

The GB team of Lorraine Lambert, Mandy Pankhurst, Ryan Cockbill, Tim Jeffery and Issy Bailey won the following medals:

R2 (10m Air Rifle Standing Women SH1)
Bronze – Lorraine Lambert

R3 (10m Air Rifle Prone Mixed SH1)
Gold – Lorraine Lambert

R4 (10m Air Rifle Standing Mixed SH2)
Gold – Ryan Cockbill
Silver – Tim Jeffery

R5 (10m Air Rifle Prone Mixed SH2)
Silver – Ryan Cockbill
Bronze – Tim Jeffery

R8 (50m Rifle 3P Women SH1)
Gold – Lorraine Lambert

P2 (10m Air Pistol Women SH1)
Gold – Issy Bailey

P4 (50m Pistol Mixed SH1)
Silver – Issy Bailey

Categories
Shooting

GOLD FOR BEVIS IN CROATIA

JAMES BEVIS TOOK GOLD IN THE WORLD SHOOTING PARA SPORT WORLD CUP IN CROATIA WITH A DOMINANT PERFORMANCE IN R9 (50M RIFLE PRONE MIXED SH2). THE EVENT HAS RECENTLY BEEN ADDED TO THE PARALYMPIC PROGRAMME AND CROATIA IS THE FIRST COMPETITION WHERE IT HAS BEEN CONTESTED SINCE THE ANNOUNCEMENT.

Bevis topped qualification with 620.8, over four points clear of his closest rival. He continued to set the pace in the final taking Gold over France’s Alain Quittet and Serbia’s Dragan Ristic.

British Shooting Paralympic Programme Performance Director Pasan Kularatne said “We are pleased that R9 has been added to the Paralympic Programme for Tokyo to provide more opportunity for SH2 shooters. This is James Bevis’s first international competition of the year and I am very pleased that his hard work, suppotrted by the staff team, has earned him Gold in R9 with a finals World Record.”

Earlier in the competition Bevis had made the R4 (10m Air Rifle Standing Mixed SH2) final, qualifying in fourth place in his least preferred event and finishing fifth in the final. Ryan Cockbill finished 20th after a mistake in the third string cost him a shot.

Matt Skelhon qualified top in R3 (10m Air Rifle Prone Mixed SH1) but could not maintain his form in the final, finishing sixth. Lorraine Lambert was in 18th with ex-serviceman Vinod Budhathoki making his international debut in 24th place. Lambert also finished 8th in R2 (10m Air Rifle Standing Women SH1)

In the pistol events Stewart Nangle qualified top in P1 (10m Air Pistol Men SH1) with a score of 572 but did not finish in the medals, ending up in fifth place. Issy Bailey was also a finalist in P2 (10m Air Pistol, both qualifying and finishing in fifth. Nangle and Bailey will shoot on the final day of competition in P4 (50m Pistol Mixed SH1) while Skelhon and Lambert go again in R6 (50m Rifle Prone Mixed SH1). Bevis will be on the look out for another medal as he and Cockbill finish up with R5 (10m Air Rifle Prone Mixed SH2)

Categories
Shooting

SILVER LINING FOR SKELHON IN CROATIA

MULTIPLE PARALYMPIC MEDALLIST MATT SKELHON TOPPED QUALIFICATION IN R6 (50M RIFLE PRONE MIXED SH1) AT THE WORLD SHOOTING PARA SPORT WORLD CUP IN CROATIA BUT WAS PIPPED TO THE GOLD BY HIS OLD RIVAL VERONIKA VADIVICOVA OF SLOVAKIA.

As he had done earlier in the week in R3 (10m Air Rifle Prone Mixed SH1), Skelhon dominated the sixty shot qualification round. He scored 621.3, ahead of Vadivicova with 618.9. Lorraine Lambert missed the final, finishing in 12th.

Skelhon took an early lead in the final but fell behind in the first elimination round. He recovered to lie 0.1 points behind the Slovak with two shots remaining. Vadivicova held her nerve to take the Gold with a finals score of 248.4, just 0.4 ahead of Skelhon.

In R5 (10m Air Rifle Prone Mixed SH2) Great Britain had two finalists. James Bevis, riding high on the previous day’s Gold medal in R9, qualified in sixth with Ryan Cockbill 3rd. Bevis finished just outside the medals but will be happy with his weeks work after a 4th place finish. Cockbill was the second athlete eliminated finishing in 7th.

In P4 (50m Pistol Mixed SH1) Stewart Nangle finished 10th and Issy Bailey 19th.

The British Shooting Paralympic Programme squad finished the competition with two individual medals from Skelhon and Bevis. Nangle, Bailey, Cockbill and Lambert all made finals while Vinod Budhathoki made his international debut.

Categories
Shooting

links

PLEASE USE THE FOLLOWING LINKS TO VISIT THE WEBSITES OF PARTNERS AND SUPPORTERS OF DSGB

IPC Shooting – International Federation for Paralympic Shooting

UK Sport – Provide support to the World Class Performance Programme

British Paralympic Association – Takes the GB team to the Paralympic Games

British Shooting – NGB for Olympic Shooting in the UK

NSRA – National Smallbore Rifle Association

ISSF – International Federation for Olympic Target Shooting

WheelPower – NDSO for Wheelchair Sport

Stoke Mandeville Stadium – Birthplace of Paralympic Sport

1Life – Manage Stoke Mandeville Stadium on behlf of WheelPower

Disabled Shooters Group – National Body for Disabled Clay Target Shooting

Eley – Supplier of .22 ammunition

Airarms – Supplier of .177 ammunition

Complete Coherence – Leadership Consultancy

Scopesman – Leader in rifle scope

Bobergarms – Leader in Holster

Categories
Shooting

CLASSIFICATION

Anybody who wishes to compete at an international level must receive a medical classification based on the functional level of their disability.  This is first done at national level by the national classifier and then again later by two independent international classifiers.  It is important to note that not everybody with a physical disability is able to be classified.  Those people who are deemed to be unclassifiable will not be able to compete at international level, but can still compete in national competitions.  Classifications can also be changed at any time.

Shooting uses a classification system which enables athletes from different disability groups with the same level of functional ability to compete together.

They are divided into two classifications as follows (as determined by IPC Shooting regulations).

  • SH1 – Pistol and Rifle competitors that do not require a shooting stand.
  • SH2 – Rifle competitors who are not able to support the weight of the firearm with their arms and therefore require a spring mounted stand to shoot.

There are 10 events for SH1 athletes and two for SH2 shooters.

Each classification is broken down into sub-classifications, as follows:

SH1

SH1A – Sitting competitors who are able to stand and have normal trunk functions. No backrest is allowed on the shooting chair. These competitors may choose to stand to compete if they wish.

SH1B – Sitting competitors who have non-functional lower limbs or severe problems in lower limbs and have good pelvis control (functional abdominal/spinal extensors, m.quadratus lumborum). A low backrest is allowed on the shooting chair.

SH1C – Sitting competitors with non-functional lower limbs or severe problems in lower limbs and fair/none trunk functions. A high backrest is allowed on the shooting chair.

All competitors in class SH1 compete in the same class; the subclasses are only to define the backrest height according to their classification.

Sitting competitors in class SH1A may choose to stand, but if so they must stand free of any artificial support with the exception of medically certified normal prosthesis/orthosis.

In the case of SH1 arm-amputee shooters, it is allowed to hold the rifle with a normal prosthesis, as long as the prosthesis does not grip the rifle and does not have a fixed elbow.

SH2

Rifle competitors who have measurable and/or visible permanent disability in upper limbs and therefore are unable to support the weight of a rifle for the purpose of the competitions with their upper limbs and require a shooting stand.

These groupings of disabilities are to be used as a guide only and the classification panel can assess each case in their full shooting equipment in the shooting positions.

SH2A – Sitting competitors who have one non-functional upper limb or severe problems with both upper limbs and have normal trunk functions. No backrest is allowed on the shooting chair. These competitors may choose to stand to compete if they wish.

SH2B – Sitting competitors who have non-functional lower limbs or severe problems in lower limbs and have good pelvis control. A low backrest is allowed on the shooting chair.

SH2C – Sitting competitors who have non-functional lower limbs or severe problems in lower limbs and have fair/none trunk functions. A high backrest is allowed on the shooting chair.

(Note: The high backrest is up to 10 cm below the armpits).

All competitors in class SH2 compete in the same class; the subclasses are only to define the backrest height and the spring flexibility according to the classification.

All competitors in Class SH2 compete in the same class and will use an approved support stand to support the weight of the rifle. No other support or mechanical devices may be used as a support for the rifle. The shooting stand may be fixed to the table or on a tripod.

The combination of balance, disability and arm/finger strength and function will determine which spring the shooter shall use and will be assessed at the classification.

Categories
Shooting

PARALYMPIC SHOOTING EVENTS

Shooting has been a Paralympic Sport since the Toronto Paralympic Games in 1976 and Great Britain has won medals in every Paralympics since then.

Four different types of weapon are used: rifle, pistol, air rifle and air pistol.  The air weapons are powered by a compressed air cylinder which forces .177 (inch) pellets out of the gun, while the firearms shoot .22 cartridges.

There are 12 shooting events in the Paralympics – five with the air rifle, three with the rifle, and two each for the pistol and air pistol. 

All the air rifle events are 10m and take place indoors. The standing events are split into SH1 (men and women) and SH2 (mixed), while both prone categories (SH1 & SH2) are mixed. 

The air pistol events are also 10m indoors, split into men and women, while the pistol events take place outside and feature mixed groups shooting at targets of 25m and 50m. The rifle events are all 50m and held outside, with a mixed prone event and separate three position competitions for men and women.

Rifle and air rifle competitors can compete in the standing (the elbows are not supported so the competitors have to support the weight of the rifle themselves), the prone (elbows are supported on a table) and 3-Position (prone, standing and kneeling). 

In the men’s and mixed competitions, shooters fire 60 rounds, while in the women’s events they shoot 40. The men’s three position event sees 40 shots in each position, making 120 in total, while the women’s equivalent is 20 in each position.

The top eight shooters from qualification progress to a 10-shot final where  decimal scores are used to separate the shooters. 

There are different sized targets for each distance and weapon type, but all feature 10 concentric rings – with the centre worth a maximum 10 points.